Guide to the Issues: ALEC IN NEW MEXICO

ALEC IN NEW MEXICO

This report is part of our multi-part 2014 Citizen’s Guide to the Issues and ALEC in New Mexico.   Learn more about the report or jump to other sections with the links below.

Read the full guide with more issues here

Guide to the Issues: Status of Women in New Mexico
Guide to the Issues: Minimum Wage & Income Inequality
Guide to the Issues: Driver’s License Policy
Guide to the Issues: ALEC IN NEW MEXICO
Guide to the Issues: ALEC-member corporate lobbyists in New Mexico
Guide to the Issues: ALEC Dollars in the Roundhouse

ALEC is “the most influential corporate-funded political force most of American has never heard of.”  It’s been described as  “dating service” for corporations and legislators and a Common Cause complaint led to the IRS launching an investigation into

Inside ALEC in New Mexico

Inside ALEC in New Mexico

the organization’s tax-exempt status.  Some states have already started investigations into whether ALEC’s “scholarships” are actually contributions members should publicly report.

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) brings together nearly 2,000 state legislators with hundreds of corporate leaders and lobbyists from the world’s most powerful corporations to secretly draft model legislation that benefits the corporate bottom-line.

They wine and dine legislators who then bring this “model legislation” back to states, including New Mexico, where they introduce it without ever disclosing the hidden source or benefactors of this corporate-made legislation.
Most notably, they drafted and fed the NRA’s “Stand Your Ground” laws that led to the tragic killing of Trayvon Martin in Florida. But they are also behind recent “Right to Work For Less” laws in Wisconsin and Michigan, private prisons and voter suppression laws in New Mexico and across the country.

ALEC is alive and well in New Mexico and we’re turning up the heat on legislators and companies to get out. In 2012 ALEC’s state chairman, Rep. Paul Bandy, proudly boasted to us that New Mexico’s ALEC caucus is much larger than that already exposed.  So we’re out to out them all.

HOUSE

  1. Rep. Thomas A. Anderson (R-290
  2. Rep. Alonzo Baldonado (R-80
  3. Rep. Paul Bandy (R-3), ALEC State ChairmanALEC Members in NM
  4. Rep. Anna M. Crook (R-64)
  5. Rep. Nora Espinoza (R-59)
  6. Rep. Nathaniel Quentin Gentry  (R-30)
  7. Rep. William Gray (R-54)
  8. Rep. Jimmie Hall (R-28)
  9. Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-51)
  10. Rep. Larry A. Larranaga (R-27)
  11. Rep. William R. Rehm (R-31)
  12. Rep. Dennis Roch (R-67)
  13. Rep. James R.J. Strickler (R-2)

SENATE

  1. Sen. Sue Beffort (R-19)
  2. Senator Lee Cotter (R -36)
  3. Senator William Burt (R –33)
  4. Sen. William H. Payne (R-20),  ALEC State Chairman
  5. Sen. Sander Rue (R-23)
  6. Sen. William E. Sharer (R-1)

MEMBERSHIP HAS ITS PRIVILEGES
Corporate backers of ALEC have funneled an estimated $4 million in gifts to state legislators for travel, hotel rooms, and meals at posh resorts with corporate lobbyists since 2006.

Leaked ALEC documents show just some of those New Mexico legislators receiving ‘scholarship’ funds, and who funded those trips (view the national report here)

New Mexico’s two public co-chairs, Rep. Paul Bandy and Sen. Bill Payne, control the ‘scholarship’ fund.

ALEC sholarship fund

FINDING ALEC IN THE ROUNDHOUSESearchForALEC

MODEL BILLS

  • Compare bills against these known ALEC bills to find
    ALEC fingerprints on suspect bills
  • ALECexposed.org
    • Task Force/Issue areas on the left, search bar on the top

READ MORE

This report is part of our multi-part 2014 Citizen’s Guide to the Issues and ALEC in New Mexico.   Learn more about the report or jump to other sections with the links below.

Read the full guide with more issues here

Guide to the Issues: ALEC IN NEW MEXICO
Guide to the Issues: ALEC-member corporate lobbyists in New Mexico
Guide to the Issues: ALEC Dollars in the Roundhouse

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